St. Bonaventure University

Faculty


Elenchin, William

elenchin-alan

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
Sociology
ACADEMIC SCHOOL
School of Arts and Sciences

TITLES/RESPONSIBILITIES
Associate Professor, Sociology
Sociology Program Chair
Criminology Program Chair
CONTACT
Office phone: (716) 375-2295
Send an Email
OFFICE
Plassmann Hall A-6
COURSES TAUGHT
  • CLAR 105. Inquiry in the Social World 
  • CLAR 401. The University Forum 
  • SOC 101. Introductory Sociology
  • SOC 103. Introduction to Social Work 
  • SOC 301-302. Current Social Problems: Field Work Study 
  • SOC 304. Community Organization 
  • SOC 307. Criminology and Penology
  • SOC 308. Juvenile Delinquency 
  • SOC 320. Social Psychology of Addiction 
  • SOC 408. Health and Illness 
  • SOC 412. Senior Seminar 
  • SOC 420. Special Topics: Sociology of Sports
ACADEMIC DEGREES
  • Ph.D., Human Services, Capella University, 2005
  • M.A., Criminology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1994
  • B.S., Administration of Justice, Pennsylvania State University, 1985
OTHER EDUCATION
PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND
ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Publications 

  • Elenchin, William (2013).  Happy Without the Meal; Reflections from Catholic Faith and Reason. Wipf & Stock: Eugene Oregon
  • Elenchin, William (2009). Hidden Courage: Reconnecting Faith and Character with Mental Wellness. Wipf & Stock: Eugene, Oregon. 
  • Elenchin, W. (2005). Wraparound Behavioral Health: Breaking With Traditional Mental Health Services. The School of Human Services E-Monograph, 2 (1).

Presentation 

  • Elenchin, W. (2005), “Religion and Mental Health: Advantages and Drawbacks of Incorporating Faith in the Treatment of Behavioral Health Issues," annual meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, Rochester, New York.

Student Involvement 

  • Adviser to Peer Coach program
  • Member, First Year Experience Committee (FYE)
  • Member, All Bonaventure Reads Committee (ABR)
  • Member, Honor Council
TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

I believe higher education ought to be about growing in both knowledge and wisdom, as opposed to the sterile accumulation of information. Knowledge, of course, refers to the acquisition of ideas through books and lectures, but also relates to the development of critical thinking skills and a lifelong love of learning.  Wisdom goes beyond knowledge, enabling us to make practical judgments regarding those values which will guide us in our “good journey” through life.

Perhaps wisdom helps us understand that it is often through the challenges of life (difficult coursework, exams, old and new friendships) that we become a better person. These ideas can be summed up as follows:

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically.
Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education.”

--Martin Luther King, Jr.

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS/PROJECTS
I am working on a publication that explores the relationships among culture, media, faith, and wellness.
PERSONAL INTERESTS/COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
LINKS