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For more information about the undergraduate Adolescence Education Major, please contact:

Gabriel Swarts
Dr. Gabrial Swarts
Assistant Professor
Adolescence Education Chair
B52 Plassmann Hall
Send an email
(716) 375-2395


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Adolescence Education major

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My turn to teach

Preparation for teacher certification in specific subjects

Are you interested in becoming a teacher?  The undergraduate major in Adolescence Education is designed for students to pursue initial secondary content-specific teacher certification in New York state (grades 7-12).

The major, in collaboration with departments within the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education, prepares students to be secondary teachers in biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, social studies and Spanish. Should you be interested in working outside of New York state, our certification office will advise you on obtaining certificates in other states.

The Adolescence Education program not only provides you with opportunities to build and refine your knowledge about teaching, it also engages you in extensive experiences interning and teaching in secondary classrooms.

This major requires a two-day-a-week internship during the spring semester of the junior year and a semester of full-time student teaching. The student teaching semester is generally in the fall of the senior year, but accommodations can be made for spring student teaching when necessary.

Students enrolled in the Adolescence Education major will be assigned an adviser from the School of Education in addition to their content concentration-specific adviser.   

Features of the Program

Graduates of the Adolescence Education program are:
  • content-area experts with a concentration — or at least 30 credits of coursework — in their teaching subject(s);
  • held to rigorous standards, and supported throughout the process by both an adviser from the School of Education as well as from their disciplinary concentration;
  • experienced at both the middle and high school levels, with significant classroom experiences beginning in the first education course. Before student teaching, students will have spent more than 250 hours in schools;
  • equipped with a repertoire of strategies that serve the diverse needs of students;
  • prepared with theory and research that informs practice, allowing them to create learning environments that support student success;
  • lifelong learners who are committed to serving as change agents, working for social justice in the communities where they teach!

News, Publications & Research

More

Albany Law School professor to speak at St. Bonaventure Sept. 25

Sep 20, 2013 | Paul Finkelman, Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center at the Albany Law School, will visit St. Bonaventure next week as the Lenna Visiting Professor.

Finkelman will speak at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25, in the Walsh Center Auditorium on “The Ten Commandments on the Courthouse Lawn: Why People of Faith Should Oppose Religious Monuments on Public Space.” The talk will count as a senior forum plenary but is also open to the public.

A specialist in race and law, American legal history, and constitutional law, Finkelman has had more than 150 scholarly articles and more than 30 books published. Other pieces have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today and The Huffington Post. He is an expert in constitutional history, freedom of religion, the law of slavery, civil liberties and the American Civil War.

Finkelman also served as the chief expert witness in the Alabama Ten Commandments monument case in 2003, and the U.S. Supreme Court cited his scholarship on religious monuments in public spaces. He also appeared on television when C-SPAN recorded Finkelman’s two-hour class on the Dred Scott case, which aired nationally and is now a part of C-Span’s series on American History.

Dr. Karen Robbins, assistant professor of history, nominated Finkelman for the visiting professorship.

“In today’s world, students can readily see the potentially explosive role of religion when connected to politics. A quick look at the Middle East reveals that,” she said. “But, less well known, our own history also illustrates what can happen when politics and religion are connected.”

Robbins said St. Bonaventure students of all majors would benefit from listening to Finkelman’s talk.

“We are very fortunate to have a nationally renowned legal historian visiting us as a Lenna Professor and that one of his areas of expertise is religion and the law,” she said. “The Supreme Court takes his scholarship on this seriously, and has cited him. If that body listens to him, we should too.”

The Lenna Endowed Visiting Professorship, established in 1990, is funded through gifts from the late Betty S. Lenna Fairbank and Reginald A. Lenna of Jamestown. It is designed to bring scholars of stature in their field to St. Bonaventure University and Jamestown Community College for public lectures.

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About the University: The nation’s first Franciscan university, St. Bonaventure University cultivates graduates who are confident and creative communicators, collaborative leaders and team members, and innovative problem solvers who are respectful of themselves, others, and the diverse world around them. We are establishing pathways to internships, graduate schools and careers in the context of our renowned liberal arts tradition. Our students are becoming extraordinary.
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