Contact Us

For more information, please contact our Program Director:

Dr. Jones-Carey
Dr. Margaret Jones-Carey

B40 Plassmann Hall
(716) 375-4026
Email: mjonesca@sbu.edu

To Apply

For application instructions and materials, please visit our site:


 Or contact:

Phone: (716) 375-2021


SCHOOL BUILDING LEADER CERTIFICATE

The SBL Advanced Certificate program is designed for elementary and secondary teachers and school counselors seeking to become school principals. This offering is 24 hours in length, and includes coursework in curriculum development, leading effective inclusive schools, school finance and law, supervision, leadership and school-community relations. Six (6) hours of equivalent coursework may be accepted for transfer with the approval of the program director.

The SBL program is offered via a unique "hybrid" format. Each class meets 3 times (on Saturdays) per semester, with the rest of the course work completed online. The setting for these Saturday sessions alternates between the University’s Olean and Hamburg locations.

The SBL program offers fall and spring starts and can be finished up in four semesters with no summer classes, or completed in 18 months through an accelerated program including summer study. 

The SBL program meets New York state course requirements for SBL certification.


With six additional credits, SBL students can receive the MSED in Educational Leadership.

SBL program requirements

Admission to the SBL programs requires:

  • Master’s degree in education or a certification-related area, with a 3.0 or better GPA
  • Teacher or school counselor certification
  • Three years of K-12 school experience
  • GRE or MAT score (NY State requirement)
  • References (two, at least one from a supervising principal or superintendent)
  • Interview & writing sample
Here is more information about this program: Fact Sheet

News, Publications & Research

More News
request-info-button

Program Brochure

Learn more about our Educational Leadership programs in our electronic brochure.

Casey, Nancy Cunniff

TITLES/RESPONSIBILITIES Associate Professor
ACADEMIC SCHOOL School of Education
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT Elementary Education
CONTACT INFORMATION Office Phone: (716) 375-2141
E-Mail: ncasey@sbu.edu
Website: http://sched.sbu.edu/faculty/ncasey/ 
OFFICE LOCATION B38 Plassmann Hall
COURSES TAUGHT
ACADEMIC DEGREES
  • Ed.D., Instructional Technology and Media, specializing in Computing in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1988 
    • Dissertation title: "The Graphical Representation of Programming: A Study of the Comprehension of Novice Programmers."
     
  • M.A., Computing in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1983
  • M.Ed., Early Childhood Education, Rutgers University, 1979
  • B.A., Early Childhood and Elementary Education, College of St. Elizabeth, 1974
OTHER EDUCATION
PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
  • Principal investigator on a $1.16 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology (PT3), 1999-2003
  • Development of electronic portfolio design and process for St. Bonaventure University’s School of Education graduates
    • Casey, N. (2003). "From 0 to 60: Up to Speed with eFolios in One Year."  Technology in Teacher Education Annual, 2003. Charlottesville, Va: Association for Advancement in Computing in Education. Presented at SITE 2003.
    • Casey, N.  (2001). "Growing Towards Excellence: A Developmental Approach to Portfolio Development for Beginning Teachers." ACEI Annual Conference, Toronto, CA:  April 2001.
    • Casey, N. (2001). "E-Folios for Educators: Electronic – and Truly Portable – Portfolios." PAC-TE Annual Conference, Hershey, Pa. October 2001.
     
  • Seel, N.M. & Casey, N. (2003). Changing conceptions of technological literacy.  In P. Attewell & N.M. Seel, (Eds.) "Disadvantaged Teens and Computer Technologies." New York: Waxman Publishing Co.
  • Taylor, R. P. & Cunniff, N. (1988). Moving computing in education beyond rhetoric. Teachers College Record,  89:3, 360-372.
TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

I am a teacher.  I believe that teachers have the most important role in our society. They have the awesome responsibility of supporting, leading, guiding and coaxing others as they learn. They have the enviable opportunity to see others discover and to see learners embrace new worlds. Being a teacher is a way of thinking about the world. It compels one to view every interaction with an eye towards growth -- of self and others. This is not a simple vocation.

I am a constructivist educator. As a constructivist, I believe that each learner builds his or her own understanding of the world. As Vygotsky proposed, learning is socially constructed, and it is through interactions with others that learning takes place. Students need opportunities to collaborate with each other and with me as they learn and learn to teach. I want my students to become empowered by their own learning and development as teachers. I continuously work to create situations where students can take charge of what they need to learn.

Teaching university students is a continuously challenging situation. My beliefs about teaching and learning in this setting are influenced to a large degree by Piagetian theory. Students must experience disequilibrium and cognitive dissonance in order to learn. Students must have experiences that cause them an acceptable degree of cognitive discomfort, but in situations where they can build relationships between what they already know and the new learning.

As a teacher, I am a learner. I seek challenges; I solve problems. I believe that I must travel alongside my students in the teaching-learning process. I have come to believe that there are no perfect tools and no exclusively "right" ways to teach. I embrace new technologies with an appreciation of the worlds they can help us explore, but I also appreciate traditional techniques.

The educational context specific to a pre-professional undergraduate school in which all students major in education is unique. These students have already made difficult and important life choices. They have chosen the field of education as their career, and thus their study is a recursive activity. Even more importantly, the education about education should be metacognitive. I believe that I have a responsibility to help my students develop as teachers who make a difference, teachers whose classrooms will be healthy, supportive environments in which their own students can grow and learn.

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS/PROJECTS
  • Parent perceptions of first-year students’ transition difficulties
  • College teaching: Improved student engagement through active and collaborative teaching
  • Problems faced by first-year college students: barrier to success
PERSONAL INTERESTS/COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT